Tippett Receives 2014 McCarthy Award

McCarthy_Award_2014_01_DanAddison

Gerald McCarthy (right) presents the 2014 McCarthy Award to John Tippett (left).

Photo courtesy of Dan Addison, UVA Office of Communications

The Virginia Natural Resources Leadership Institute (VNRLI) announced John Tippett, recently retired Executive Director of the Friends of the Rappahannock (FOR), as the recipient of the 2014 Gerald P. McCarthy Award for Leadership in Environmental Conflict Resolution. The VNRLI presents the annual McCarthy award to an individual who demonstrates leadership in preserving and protecting the Commonwealth’s environment through collaboration.

Tippett is regarded as an influential leader who has collaborated with diverse stakeholders to effect positive change throughout the Rappahannock River watershed. In his role with FOR Tippett successfully led a 10-year advocacy campaign that resulted in the removal of the non-functional Embrey Dam, and engaged key stakeholders to ensure that 4,232 acres of land surrounding the Rappahannock and Rapidan rivers would be placed into an easement, permanently protecting the local water supply and preserving wilderness in a developed region. Additionally, Tippett initiated collaboration with local government to promote low-impact development, and played a key role in designing the state stormwater regulations. Jennifer Allen, who worked with Tippett at FOR, says “John became my role model on how to engage diverse stakeholders to constructively resolve environmental issues and how to develop innovative and compelling approaches to complex challenges.” In recognition of a career that exemplifies the use of collaboration and conflict resolution, John Tippett is the recipient of the 2014 McCarthy Award.

The Virginia Natural Resources Leadership Institute (VNRLI) is a partnership program between the UVa Institute for Environmental Negotiation, Virginia Cooperative Extension at Virginia Tech, Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, and Virginia Department of Forestry. VNRLI’s mission is to develop leaders throughout Virginia who can help groups involved in contentious natural resources issues move beyond conflict toward consensus building and collaborative problem solving. IEN created the Gerald P. McCarthy Award for Leadership in Environmental Conflict Resolution in 2004 to honor McCarthy, its first recipient, for his visionary contributions to promote environmental conflict resolution in Virginia.

 

IEN Announces Dennis Treacy as the Recipient of McCarthy Award for Leadership in Environmental Conflict Resolution

The Institute for Environmental Negotiation at the University of Virginia is pleased to announce that Dennis Treacy, the Chief Sustainability Officer for Smithfield Foods, is the recipient of this year’s Gerald P. McCarthy Award for Leadership in Environmental Conflict Resolution.

The institute gives the annual McCarthy Award to an individual, organization, local government, agency, educational institution or community member who demonstrates leadership in the effort to preserve and protect the commonwealth’s environment; supports collaborative problem-solving through actions, contributions or educational programs; and who is a role model to others for the resolution of environmental issues.  Mr. Treacy exemplifies these characteristics in his behind the scenes work to protect the environment through collaborative approaches, at both Smithfield Foods and Virginiaforever, for which he currently serves on the Board of Directors.

Dennis Treacy is regarded as a highly influential leader who has collaborated with diverse stakeholders to change the face of corporate responsibility in Virginia. At Smithfield Foods, he has worked to transform Smithfield into a leader in sustainability best practices by helping the company adopt a formal Corporate Social Responsibility Plan. Before his tenure at Smithfield, he was Director of the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, where he brought together business, environmental groups, and the public to address issues of mutual importance. He draws from these experiences as a tireless advocate on behalf of Virginiaforever, an organization that advocates for funding for land preservation and water quality. Mr. Treacy often speaks about “The Virginia Way,” which is, in his words, about encouraging people and corporations to think outside the box and collaborate. Dennis Treacy practices “The Virginia Way” every day, which is why he is the recipient of this year’s McCarthy Award.

The Institute will present the award on behalf of the Virginia Natural Resources Leadership Institute, a partnership program between the Virginia Department of Forestry, the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, the Cooperative Extension at Virginia Tech and the Institute for Environmental Negotiation. The mission of the Virginia Natural Resources Leadership Institute is to develop leaders throughout Virginia who can help groups involved in contentious natural resources issues move beyond conflict toward consensus-building and collaborative problem-solving.

The McCarthy Award will be presented to Mr. Treacy, in conjunction with the graduation of the 2013 Class of the Virginia Natural Resources Leadership Institute on June 6 at the Charlottesville DoubleTree.

For information on the McCarthy Award and the Virginia Natural Resource Leadership Institute, contact Melissa Keywood, Program Manager, at 434-924-6569 or mak2ye@virginia.edu.

Seeking Nominations for 10th Annual McCarthy Award

The Institute for Environmental Negotiation (IEN) at the University of Virginia is seeking nominations for the tenth annual Gerald P. McCarthy Award for Leadership in Environmental Conflict Resolution.

IEN’ s mission is to practice conflict resolution and consensus building, to learn from that practice, and to teach and build capacity of others, all in the service of creating ecologically, socially, and economically sustainable communities.

IEN gives the annual McCarthy award to an individual, organization, local government, agency, educational institution or community who demonstrates leadership in the effort to preserve and protect the commonwealth’s environment; supports collaborative problem solving through actions, contributions and/or educational programs; and who is a role model to others for the resolution of environmental issues.

IEN will accept nominations for this year’s award through April 30. A nomination form is available at www.virginia.edu/ien/mccarthyaward.htm. IEN will present the 2013 award on behalf of the Virginia Natural Resources Leadership Institute (VNRLI), a partnership program between the UVa Instiutute for Environmental Negotiation, Virginia Cooperative Extension at Virginia Tech, Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, and Virginia Department of Forestry. VNRLI’s mission is to develop leaders throughout Virginia who can help groups involved in contentious natural resources issues move beyond conflict toward consensus building and collaborative problem solving.

IEN will announce this year’s recipient at the graduation of the 2013 Virginia Natural Resources Leadership Institute class in Charlottesville, VA, on June 6.

IEN created the Gerald P. McCarthy Award for Leadership in Environmental Conflict Resolution in 2004 to honor McCarthy, its first recipient, and to honor his varied contributions to protect and promote environmental literacy in Virginia. Among other accomplishments, McCarthy brought environmental mediation to Virginia. As Executive Director of the Virginia Environmental Endowment McCarthy has been instrumental in awarding funding to create and continue support of IEN.

Last year’s McCarthy Award was presented to Mr. Mark Miller, the Virginia Organizer for the Southern Appalachian Forest Coalition. Mark promoted improved management plans for the Jefferson and Washington National Forests in Virginia. Mark’s public outreach and organizing were key to the successful campaign, maintained during many years, to designate 53,000 acres of Wilderness and National Scenic Area in the Jefferson National Forest in southwestern Virginia in the Virginia Ridge and Valley Act of 2010.  He was instrumental in bringing varied stakeholders into the process, many of whom were not traditional supporters of wilderness protection, including hunters, mountain bikers, tourism interests, local government officials, business owners, garden clubs and faith groups.

For more information on the McCarthy Award and the Virginia Natural Resource Leadership Institute, contact Melissa Keywood, Program Manager, at 434-924-6569 or mak2ye@virginia.edu.

VNRLI Kicks Off 13th Year with Madison County Workshop

University of Virginia
News Release
Office of Public Affairs/Media Relations

Contact: Jane Ford
434-924-4298
jford@virginia.edu

Va. Natural Resources Leadership Kicks Off 13th Year with Madison County Workshop
Charlottesville, Va., Sept. 6, 2012 — Virginia’s natural resource management leaders will gather Sept. 19 through 21 at Graves Mountain Lodge in the Madison County town of Syria for a workshop to kick off the 13th year of the Virginia Natural Resources Leadership Institute. The institute’s program consists of six three-day learning sessions offered in different locations throughout the commonwealth.

Participants in the program, referred to as “fellows,” are drawn from Virginia industry, business, local and state government and the environmental community, and will work together to develop skills in conflict resolution, personal leadership and collaborative dialogue.

In addition to beginning the core curriculum, fellows will hear from guest speakers about the displacement of families from lands that became part of the Shenandoah National Park in the early 1930s and its ongoing legacy. Speakers are scheduled to include descendants of displaced families and a representative from the park. The fellows will also hear from Del. Ed Scott, R-Culpeper, on leadership and natural resources.

The Virginia Natural Resources Leadership Institute is a partnership of the University of Virginia’s Institute for Environmental Negotiation, Virginia Tech Cooperative Extension, the Virginia Department of Forestry and the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation.

The program is supported in part by Dominion Resources and Merck and Company, which in turn support collaborative decision-making for protecting Virginia’s environment and natural resources. The institute receives additional funds from the George Beals Conservation Leadership Fund of the Virginia Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts Educational Foundation, Altria Group Inc. and individual alumni.

The institute is designed to encourage communication and understanding between people representing different interests in Virginia’s natural resource issues. Each three-day session offers interactive exercises that focus on a topic such as conflict resolution, facilitation, consensus-building, interest-based negotiation, public involvement, environmental justice and collaborative leadership.

After the Madison County session, the cohort will gather in Suffolk to learn about issues impacting the Chesapeake Bay, in Richmond to learn about land use and growth management challenges and legislative priorities, in the Shenandoah Valley to learn about sustainable agriculture and impacts of agricultural waste management on water quality, and in Southwest Virginia to learn about coal mining, land reclamation and sustainable forestry.

The session is not open to the public, but media can contact Melissa Keywood at mkeywood@virginia.edu or 434-924-6569 about the proceedings or visit the program’s website for information.
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Forest Advocate Wins McCarthy Award for Environmental Conflict Resolution

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June 5, 2012 — The Institute for Environmental Negotiation at the University of Virginia will present its 2012 Gerald P. McCarthy Award for Leadership in Environmental Conflict Resolution to Mark Miller, Virginia organizer for the Southern Appalachian Forest Coalition.
The McCarthy Award will be presented to Miller, who resides in Lexington, Thursday in conjunction with the graduation of the 2012 Virginia Natural Resources Leadership Institute class at the Jefferson Scholars Foundation Hall in Charlottesville.

The institute gives the annual award to an individual, organization, local government, agency, educational institution or community member demonstrating leadership in the effort to preserve and protect the commonwealth’s environment; solving problems through actions, contributions and/or educational programs; and modeling for others the resolution of environmental issues.

“Miller displayed these characteristics in his efforts to promote improved management plans for the Jefferson and Washington National Forests in Virginia,” said Sarah Francisco, senior attorney at the Southern Environmental Law Center and leader of its National Forests and Parks Program.

Miller’s public outreach and organizing were key to the successful, multi-year campaign to designate 53,000 acres of Wilderness and National Scenic Area in the Jefferson National Forest in southwestern Virginia through the Virginia Ridge and Valley Act of 2010. He was instrumental in bringing varied stakeholders into the process, many of whom were not traditional supporters of wilderness protection, including hunters, mountain bikers, tourism interests, local government officials, business owners,
garden clubs and faith groups.

“Miller has a strong gift of having no fear or hesitation about talking to potential adversaries in the effort to find common ground,” Francisco said.

The institute will present the award on behalf of the Virginia Natural Resources Leadership Institute, a partnership program between the Virginia Department of Forestry, the Virginia Tech Center for Economic Education and U.Va.’s Institute for Environmental Negotiation. The institute’s mission is to develop leaders throughout Virginia who can help groups involved in contentious natural resources issues move beyond conflict toward consensus-building and collaborative problem-solving.

The award was created in 2004 to honor McCarthy, its first recipient, and his varied contributions to protect and promote environmental literacy in Virginia. Among other accomplishments, he brought environmental mediation to Virginia. As executive director of the Virginia Environmental Endowment, McCarthy has been instrumental in awarding funding to create and continue support of the Institute for Environmental Negotiation.

For information on the McCarthy Award and the Virginia Natural Resource Leadership Institute, contact Will Callaway, program manager, at 434-924-6569 or wlc2du@virginia.edu.
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MEDIA ADVISORY: Natural Resource Leaders To Gather at U.Va. for Final Session

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June 4, 2012 — Many of Virginia’s natural resource management leaders will meet June 6 to 8 at the University of Virginia for the final three-day Virginia Natural Resource Leadership Institute-sponsored workshops. The institute’s program rotates to different locations throughout the commonwealth during each class year and finishes with graduation in Charlottesville each year.

This year’s cohort of 27 fellows – from Virginia industry, business, local and state government, and the environmental community – will conclude their yearlong work together developing skills in conflict resolution, personal leadership and collaborative dialogue.

A highlight of the annual session in Charlottesville is the graduation dinner, which includes the presentation of the Gerald P. McCarthy Award for Leadership in Environmental Conflict Resolution. This year’s winner is Mark Miller of Lexington, the Virginia organizer for the Southern Appalachian Forest Coalition.

In addition, fellows will hear presentations on climate change, energy choices and the expected impacts on Virginia’s environment from policy decisions in both areas. The keynote speaker will be Tom Peterson of Climate Strategies. Professors from U.Va., Virginia Tech and Virginia State University will join in for the institute’s sixth and final session.

The session is not open to the public, but media can contact Will Callaway at wlc2du@virginia.edu or 202-422-1174 for information about the proceedings.

The Virginia Natural Resource Leadership Institute is a partnership of the Institute for Environmental Negotiation at U.Va., Virginia Cooperative Extension at Virginia Tech, the Virginia Department of Forestry and the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation.

The institute program is supported this year by a grant from the Dominion Foundation that supports collaborative decision-making for protecting Virginia’s environment and natural resources. The institute is also supported with grants from the George Beals Conservation Leadership Fund of the Virginia Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts Educational Foundation, the Ballyshannon Fund, Merck and Company, the Virginia Department of Forestry and individual institute alumni.

The Virginia Natural Resource Leadership Institute program is designed to encourage communication and understanding between people representing different interests in Virginia’s natural resource issues. Each session offers interactive exercises that focus on a topic such as conflict resolution, facilitation, building consensus, interest-based negotiation, public involvement, environmental justice and collaborative leadership.

For information about the program, contact Callaway at wlc2du@virginia.edu.
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U.Va. Institute Seeks Nominations for Environmental Conflict Resolution Award

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February 2, 2012 — The Institute for Environmental Negotiation at the University of Virginia is seeking nominations for its Gerald P. McCarthy Award for Leadership in Environmental Conflict Resolution.

The institute’s mission is to practice conflict resolution and consensus-building, to learn from that practice and to teach and build capacity of others, all in the service of creating ecologically, socially and economically sustainable communities.

The institute gives the annual McCarthy Award to an individual, organization, local government, agency, educational institution or community member who demonstrates leadership in the effort to preserve and protect the commonwealth’s environment; supports collaborative problem-solving through actions, contributions and/or educational programs; and who is a role model to others for the resolution of environmental issues.

Nominations will be accepted through April 20. A nomination form is available online here.

The institute will present the award on behalf of the Virginia Natural Resources Leadership Institute, a partnership program between the Virginia Department of Forestry, the Virginia Tech Center for Economic Education and the Institute for Environmental Negotiation. The Virginia Natural Resources Leadership Institute’s mission is to develop leaders throughout Virginia who can help groups involved in contentious natural resources issues move beyond conflict toward consensus-building and collaborative problem-solving.

The Institute for Environmental Negotiation will announce this year’s recipient at the graduation of the 2012 Virginia Natural Resources Leadership Institute class in Charlottesville on June 7.

 

The award was created in 2004 to honor McCarthy, its first recipient, and his varied contributions to protect and promote environmental literacy in Virginia. Among other accomplishments, he brought environmental mediation to Virginia. As executive director of the Virginia Environmental Endowment, McCarthy has been instrumental in awarding funding to create and continue support of the Institute for Environmental Negotiation.

Last year’s McCarthy Award was presented to Faye Cooper, who has committed more than 30 years of her life to conservation efforts in Virginia. She was a founding member and later the executive director for the Valley Conservation Council, a private land trust that promotes land-use policies and conservation methods that protect the natural and cultural resources of the Shenandoah Valley region. In addition, she was instrumental in improving the water quality in Smith Creek in Rockingham and Shenandoah counties through her work to implement a regional, cooperative management plan.

For information on the McCarthy Award and the Virginia Natural Resource Leadership Institute, contact Will Callaway, program manager, at 434-924-6569 or wlc2du@virginia.edu.

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Natural Resouce Leaders Gather in Madison County to Kick Off Leadership Institute

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CHARLOTTESVILLE – Virginia’s natural resource management leaders are gathering Wednesday through Friday at Graves’ Mountain Lodge in Syria in Madison County for a three-day workshop to kick off the 11th year of the Virginia Natural Resources Leadership Institute. The institute’s program consists of six 3-day learning sessions offered in different locations throughout the Commonwealth.

Participants in the institute program, referred to as “fellows,” are drawn from Virginia industry, business, local and state government, and the environmental community, and will work together to develop skills in conflict resolution, personal leadership and collaborative dialogue. Under a grant from the U.S. Forest Service’s Urban and Community Forestry Grant Program, this year’s class also includes participants from Ohio and Colorado, states that are considering similar institutes.

In addition to the core curriculum, in this first session fellows will hear from guest speakers about the displacement of families from lands that became part of the Shenandoah National Park in the early 1930s and the legacy that exists today concerning that displacement. The fellows will also hear from state 30th District Del. Ed Scott on leadership and natural resources.

The Virginia Natural Resources Leadership Institute is a partnership of the University of Virginia’s Institute for Environmental Negotiation, Virginia Cooperative Extension, the Virginia Department of Forestry and the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation.

The program is supported this year by a grant from the Dominion Foundation that supports collaborative decision-making for protecting Virginia’s environment and natural resources. The institute receives additional funds from the George Beals Conservation Leadership Fund of the Virginia Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts Educational Foundation, the Ballyshannon Fund, Merck and Company, the Virginia Department of Forestry and individual institute alumni.

The institute is designed to encourage communication and understanding between people representing different interests in Virginia’s natural resource issues. Each three-day session offers interactive exercises that focus on a topic such as conflict resolution, facilitation, consensus-building, interest-based negotiation, public involvement, environmental justice and collaborative leadership.

After the visit to Madison County, the program will take leaders to the Northern Neck to learn about fisheries and issues impacting the Chesapeake Bay, to Richmond to learn about land use and growth management challenges and legislative priorities, to the Shenandoah Valley to learn about sustainable agriculture and impacts of agricultural waste management on water quality, and to Southwest Virginia to learn about coal mining, land reclamation and sustainable forestry.

For information about the program, contact Steve Talley at st.vnrli@gmail.com ,434-924-6569 or visit:

http://www.virginia.edu/ien/vnrli/vnrlibenefits1.htm

SNP displacement of residents topic of natural resources workshop

By: Aerin Curtis | Media General News Service
Published: September 24, 2010
View Article at Daily Progress

Credit: Contributed photo
Katrina Powell has written two books about the mountain people who were displaced by the creation of Shenandoah National Park

SYRIA — In the 1930s, government officials moved hundreds of families from their homes to make way for what became Shenandoah National Park. For many of the displaced mountain people, the passage of years did little to dull the ache of their loss.

More than 70 years later, the episode still offers lessons — so much so, it was a major topic during a three-day workshop for Virginia managers of natural resources. The workshop finished up Friday at Graves Mountain Lodge in Madison County.

“I think [the mountain people’s displacement] brings our attention to what eminent domain means, and how it gets enacted and who gets to decide what its public use is, is really important and how issues like race and class are all mixed up in that,” speaker Katrina Powell said at the workshop.

“That’s why for me it’s really important to keep telling the story and not forget about it because the Shenandoah National Park is a cautionary tale of how it can go wrong.”

Powell is an associate professor of English at Virginia Tech and the author of two books about families displaced to make way for the park.

Steve Talley managed the week’s program that featured Powell, other speakers and round-table discussions. The program was presented by the Virginia Natural Resources Leadership Institute, which is part of a partnership of the University of Virginia’s Institute for Environmental Negotiation, the Virginia Cooperative Extension Service, the Virginia Department of Forestry and the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation.

Talley told the 30 workshop attendees that their purpose wasn’t to make judgments or decide whether the park’s actions were right or wrong, but instead to look at what happened and learn how to avoid similar issues in future cases.

“We’re more interested in how the decision was made and how we could make those decisions better,” Talley told the group, which included “fellows” drawn from Virginia industry, business, local and state government and the environmental community. The workshop was designed to help participants hone their skills settling conflicts, as well improve their leadership and communications abilities.

“Maybe [1930s park officials] thought badly of [the mountain people] but [the mountain people] thought enough of themselves to write the letter [to the officials] in the first place and to say, ‘this is who I am and I’m not who you think I am’ and to say that ‘this is my need and I deserve to be answered at once,’” Powell told workshop participants. “There was a dialogue — they were communicating and talking and sometimes the responses were dismissive and sometime they were detailed, so the responses varied.”

However, even with the dialogue that took place after the land was taken by the government and given to the park, Powell said, tension remained between the two groups. She spoke of a lingering “bitterness” toward the park about how the situation was handled.

“It’s a really complicated story and it’s taken me 10 years to really wrap my brain around what happened,” Powell said. “I think the people here are interested in how those kinds of communications can happen from the beginning of such a project, rather than try to look back on it.”

Aerin Curtis reports for the Madison County Eagle.